Welcome to Breakdown, an unofficial resource and discussion list about the innovative guitarist/producer Michael Brook. This site is infrequently updated, but contains a great deal of background info which will remain online. For up-to-date news and information, visit Michael Brook's official site and MySpace page.

Discographies Full details on every record featuring Brook
Claude Chalhoub

Claude Chalhoub

Claude Chalhoub

Available from Amazon.com

Credits

Teldec Classics International
Hamburg, Germany
July 2001

Produced by Michael Brook
Recorded by Jacquie Turner and Michael Brook at the Sound Factory and the Lavenderia, August 2000.
Mixed by Tchad Blake

Tracks

  1. Red Desert 7'30
    • Jason Lewis: drums
    • Michael Brook: infinite guitar
    • Hector Pereira: acoustic guitar
    • Daryl Johnson: bass
    • String Octet
    • Mel Wesson: synths
    • Kuljit Bahmra: Indian tabla
    • Rony Barrak, darbouka
    • Deepak Ram: flute
    • Claude Chalhoub: violin, viola
  2. Gnossienne 3'52
    • Claude Chalhoub: violin, piano
    • String Octet
    • Michael Brook: drum programming
    • Daryl Johnson: bass
  3. Baddour 6'49
    • Farroukh Fateh Ali Khan: vocals
    • Jason Lewis: drums
    • String Octet
    • Claude Chalhoub: violin
  4. Oriental Images 5'28
    • Jamil Akhatar: tabla
    • Wajid Ali: dola
    • Michael Brook: sitar guitar
    • String Octet
    • Claude Chalhoub: violin
  5. Don't Wake Me Up 3'57
    • Daryl Johnson: bass
    • Hector Pereira: guitar
    • String Octet
    • Jamil Akhatar: tabla
    • Wajid Ali: dola
    • Brian Penzonne: piano
    • Claude Chalhoub: violin
  6. Kaa 4'20
    • Claude Chalhoub: violin, harmonium
    • Michael Brook: treatments
  7. Two Angels 7'41
    • String Octet
    • Brian Penzonne: piano
    • Claude Chalhoub: violin
  8. Melancholia 10'59
    • Tchad Blake: hubub
    • Hector Pereir: acoustic guitar
    • Michael Brook: bass, electric guitar
    • Rony Barrak: djembe, rik
    • Kuljit Bahmra: Indian tabla
    • Pejman Hadadi: dombek
    • Claude Chalhoub: violin, bass, keyboard
  9. Don't Wake Me Up (Spring Mix) 3'57
    • Daryl Johnson: bass
    • Hector Pereira: guitar
    • String Octet
    • Jamil Akhatar: tabla
    • Wajid Ali: dola
    • Brian Penzonne: piano
    • Claude Chalhoub: violin

Notes

Michael Brook's liner notes:

When I first heard Claude's demos for his album I was immediately impressed by the force and passion of his musical personality. His violin playing had that larger than life, in your face quality that great singers have and I was sold on the idea of us working together. There have been a few 'East-West' hybrid projects over the years, some good, most bad. Claude is unuusally adept and has strong claims to legitimacy in both camps. His family tradition of playing Lesbanese music combined with a first rate Western classical education allow him a fluidity and grace in this fusion of cultures.

As work progressed on the albuy a number of interesting and terrifying aspects of our situation emerged. I had totally underestimated how much time we needed to complete the album. Finding musicians and singers who had the character we wanted turned out to be difficult and time consuming.

Good luck brought Forroukh, brother of the late Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, to Los Angeles for a concert with his son Rahat Fateh Ali Khan. One of the most memorable evenings was Claude performing with Forroukh and Rahat at a pricate party given by Giuseppe Asaro. The truly stunning musical repartee between Claude and Rahat's group gave the audience an evening to remeber, not least when Claude wobbled over the swimming pool with his Stradivarius on the tiny stage.

As time ran out we concluded that the only way to finish the album was for Claude and I to complete structures and arrangements in one room, while Tchad Blake mixed a just completed piece next door. This, accidentally, had two fortunate effects. The first was that I wasn't with Tchad as he mixed, although I had originally intended to be incolved. This, I think, allowed Tchad to maximize the interpretive, creative aspect of his mixing, which is what I love about his work. I think my presence might have diluted this process as I would have inevitably felt obliged to make suggestions and participate in the process.

The other surprise benefit was that Claude and I, in a way, didn't really finish the music before it was mixed. This gave the album a fresh, raw, energetic, slightly chaotic quality that I feel is great. It's the quality that many demos have which gets lost as music is refined and perfected to make a "professional" product. Many of us in the music industry bemoun how finished albums are often less exciting or emotional than the demo. I really feel the opposite is true for Claude's album.

Michael Brook
Los Angeles, January 2001